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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
's in january 1860, shortly after homer had moved to new york city. in new york, homer took a few lessons in painting from frederic rondel. rondel was a rather sentimental landscape painter who had little influence on homer's style beyond his technical instruction in the use of oils. when the civil war began, harper's commissioned the artist to depict life at the front. rovi behind the lines with the potomac army, homer produced a series of closelybserved studies of camp life. homer's paintings of this period have an anecdotal or literary quality in keeping with the traditions of magazine illustration, but he also places new emphasis on pictorial design and the purely visual character of a scene-- qualities typical of the photographs of mathew brady and others. like the photographers of the civil war, whose equipment made action scenes impossible, homer preferred static group formations, and yet the feeling of directness in recording the ordinary lends to his work a special force. prisoners from the front, with its profound sense of the resignation, exhaustion, and human cost of war, evok
new york today. boy, they don't need that. bonnie schneider with a look at the forecast. good morning. >> good morning. the storm we've been talking about is working its way to extreme northeastern new england. it is hitting canada hard. quebec is getting more snow. i mentioned yesterday that cold air would come in behind the system. it sure has. scranton at 26. below freezing in new york city at 31. just to let you know, it's not over yet. a brand new storm system set up these winter weather advisories for pennsylvania and into new york, washington, d.c., and the mountains of virginia. you can see also ohio slammed again after so much snow from the first system. so the way it's going to play out, saturday into sunday, this system is likely going to bring heavier snow to areas of northern pennsylvania in terms of snowfall totals. it's not going to be as big of a snowmaker or a blizzard maker from what we saw last time, but it will produce strong snowfall through central connecticut and rhode island. new england, you know winters can be long. winter is not officially -- is officially h
four time a year. his office was in new york and in new jersey. when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut, sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and we would discuss some of the things that had not been able, but a certain amount of stuff i cannot pursue. -- could not pursue. >> did you ever get any insight on how watergate happen? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably 1992 or thereabout, he told me and indicated that john mitchell have thought so too, that this book that was coming out, "silenced coup," they thought that was probably some of what happened the guy " said mitchell on the cover on one of his editions that they thought this was sort of our happened. so i got that sense from nixon. practical back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it > how did your research and where did you have to go? how long a process? you talk about going all over the east coast, on the back. correct the principal thing i did was i had been interested in the revolution since i was a kid. i think i was probably eight or n
york city, for instance. >> dave: new jersey, connecticut. >> clayton: you're not living the dream. >> juliet: it's sort of subjective. well, actually not subjective you can look exactly at what people live here for 250 or people in san francisco, another expensive city, it doesn't go that long, didn't go that far. >> dave: the bottom line, it appears they've moved the goal post and it may be around the $400,000 mark and that may be the new 250 if you will. may be where ne get the deal done. and upwards towards the 500 mark, but here are two congressmen on perhaps moving this up. >> the $400,000 level seems to me to be about right, that represents about the top 1% of the income earners, the people who got 93% of the income growth our last year and that seems to be enough, but i think there's some flexibility there. >> it's about making sure that we can live within our means and address the real problem and that's spending. i kind of feel like i'm a lifeguard and we've got to save as many people from drowning in higher taxes as we can. >> clayton: that seems to be the new threshold
a very hard line in the talks. >>> there's growing outage here in new york city over a front-page photo from "the new york post" yesterday. this man has just fallen down on the tracks. is just seconds away from a subway train hitting and killing him. many people upset why the photographer was taking the picture and not helping the man. this morning, he's talking out, justifying why he took the photo. and why so many other folks were running away. there's nobody there trying to help him off the tracks. >> he says he was trying to help. we're going to get into that. >>> also, you guys over there took advantage of the spring weather yesterday. >> yes, we did. we needed a walk. but more importantly, we needed to see our old pal, robin. we got to walk through the riverside park, as the sun was setting on a beautiful day in manhattan. it's always the case. she's always the -- >> she looks fantastic. >> she is the best medicine for us. it was amazing. >> and let me tell you, only one of us felt good enough to keep pushing the speed of the walk. >> it's true. it's true. >> her smile is great. >
your flu shots. >>> meanwhile here in new york, police trying to find the man in this subway surveillance video, arguing with another man in the middle of the day. seconds later, he pushed that man into the path of an oncoming train. the man was killed. police are checking other video, hoping to find a clear image of the killer. no word on what the two were arguing about. >>> and finally, some quick thinking here saves the lives of these two young girls waiting for their mother outside a store. that awning above them collapses. but the girl, able to drag her sister out of the way, at the last moment. a passing truck had clipped that awning, knocking it down. thankfully, neither girl was hurt. >> wow. they look little. >> very young. >> all right. >> that was fast. >>> let's go to washington, now, for the latest on the fiscal cliff. just 28 days until everyone's taxes are set to go up. house republicans have now sent the white house their own plan for getting america's finances under control. but both sides still far apart. abc's jake tapper is covering this from the white hou
:00 in new york city. this is "the five." ♪ brand new details in the murder-suicide of n.f.l. star jovan belcher and cassandra perkins. the kansas city star and the "new york post" report that belcher spent the night drinking and partying with a girl named britney glass, at a popular bar district in downtown kansas city. belcher drove miss glass home, dropped her off and passed out in misbentley. 2:50 a.m., cops woke belcher up and told him not to drive. he called glass apt spent the next four hours in her apartment. at 6:45 a.m., he drove the bentley to his home where girlfriend perkins recently arrived with her own night out with friends. argument ensued and belcher shot perkins nine times. belcher's mother and baby were there for the shooting. after killing perkins, belcher kissed the lifeless body, walk toed his mother, kissed his baby girl and left. he drove five miles to the chiefs' practice field after several minutes of pleading with him, they couldn't talk belcher off the ledge. belcher thanked the coaches, knelt down beside a car, made a sign of a cross and put a shot to his fa
years. that being said, i think he took cruises over to the mediterranean, over to the new york. when the seas were rough, churchill insisted on watching the storm, being held there by four or five -- he described them -- as brown, burly, greek sailors. when they took their meals during those storms come they would sit on the floor with bottles of champagne between their knees. this 88, 90-year-old man -- well, not 90, but in his late 80's. he lived a very rich life. and of course, the second premier ship in the early 1950's. i think lady soames is correct and she knows her father. the last years were a slow descent. diana, the daughter, died of an overdose of barbiturates. he did not quite get it. by 88, 89, the christmas of 1964 they brought in fresh oysters and champagne. his private secretary was there. his children. christmas dinner lasted well into the 26th, and i think it was january 29 winter chill refused his brandy and cigars after dinner for the first time ever. he went into a coma and his doctor -- both doctors said, it is a question now if it is going to be a day. and it
for the new york giants. top pick. he set an all-time record . 52-twen was the final. go to ben roethlisberger, coming off of injury. big catch. mike wallace no realationn to chris. the chargers go on to win 34-24. that's what happened with the sports. big upset with the vikings and home of the bears. >> steve:-> chris wallace did you watch his power player, his dog. what a moving tribute. winston. what a life that had . a hole in their heart now he passed. >> gretchen: sorry i missed it. on a lighter note. what do airline workers think about the rest of us . have you ever done this to a flight attendant. apparently they do that when they want the flight attendant's attention. that is hated happen when people fly and are rude. 92 they looked and talked to 700 airline employees in 85 country, hey, i could use a coke over here . people trying to get off of the plane before the pilot gives the okay . stuffing too much in the overhead and charging to checked bags. you can understand it. on both sides of the aisle. >> brian: what bothers me, people ame as i am waiting in the back in the head. reall
to new york city. in new york, homer took a few lessons in painting from frederic rondel. rondel was a rather sentimental landscape painter who had little influence on homer's style beyond his technical instruction in the use of oils. when the civil war began, harper's commissioned the artist to depict life at the front. roving behind the lines with the potomac army, homer produced a series of closelybserved studies of camp life. homer's paintings of this period have an anecdotal or literary quality in keeping with the traditions of magazine illustration, but he also places new emphasis on pictorial design and the purely visual character of a scene-- qualities typical of the photographs of mathew brady and others. like the photographers of the civil war, whose equipment made action scenes impossible, homer preferred static group formations, and yet the feeling of directness in recording the ordinary lends to his work a special force. prisoners from the front, with its profound sense of the resignation, exhaustion, and human cost of war, evoked the admiration of both critics and t
with a group of u.s. hedge funds won't need to be heard in a u.s. court. the appeals division of the new york supreme court has ruled there isn't enough connection between those events and the new york state to justify the case being held there. the court ruling noted that germany's legal system would provide an adequate alternative. certainly not the last chapter in that saga. >> no. probably not the last saga in this, either. hewlett packard has suggested the u.s. is looking into questionable accounting practices. last month's ceo meg whitman used that as the basis for a nearly $9 billion write-down. the ex ceo mike lynch continues to defend the company's accounting practices. hewlett packard, a little higher in german trade this morning. but down by 20% of its value. >> not a pretty quarter for hewlett packard. >>> brent crude has climbed above the $100 a barrel mark as u.s. lawmakers attempt to avoid the fiscal cliff. but crude is poised to post its smallest gain in three years. wti is set to post its first annual last in four years. ian, welcome. we've seen this sharp decline in oil pric
dribbled in. they were rust buckets and virtually obsolete. which roosevelt told t"new york times" and congress. he said we gave them junk and we get six or seven caribbean naval bases from the empire. at one point that summer i believe churchill wrote a letter and asked roosevelt to declare war. that is how desperate he was. and so after a few brandies in t the co vilville diaries churchi says they want to us bleed to death and pick up everything that is left for free. at one point they were thinking around the dipper table of having everyone in england melt their wedding rings because it might raise $8 million or $10 million of gold and use that to buy american goods because it was all cash and carry, to shame the americans. they didn't do that. host: how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? guest: one of the things, in doing this, i had to lock at what is he interested in? what is in his head. try to place churchill in his tim times. he was interested in norway, sumatra, not japan, not the pacific. his knowledge of the geography, the politics, the milita
office was up in new york and then in saddle river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut or sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and some of the things that had not been the school -- had not been discussedable before. >> did you ever get in setting to watergate and how that happened? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably in 1992 or thereabouts. he told me and he indicated that john mitchell thought so, too, that this book that was coming out, "silent coup" -- do you remember that one? that was probably some of what happened. he quoted mitchell on the cover. they thought that this was sort of how it happened. so i got that sense from him. >> going back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it to? how did your research it? how do have to go? -- how did you have to go? >> i have been interested in the revolution since there was a little kid. i was probably eight or nine when i would make a list of generals. i did nothing that was heading for anything very useful, but i always enjoyed that. th
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> we shall go on to the end. we shall fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an ex
. the sisters were the littlefield sisters. they're from upstate new york near troy, and the first sister to come was 20 years old at the time. she came in 1866, and she had been visiting some cousins who lived in chesterfield just north of williamsburg. and they hold told her skinner was looking for new workers. >> e e e applied, got the job and became an expert spooler. and that meant she worked in the finishing section of the mill. she would wind it on the actual spools that would go to market. it was a job that required tremendous skill because you couldn't damage the silk whatsoever. this was the silk that was going to be sold. she was fantastic at it. and another sister followed her, named francis, and this is what often happened. one sister worked in the mill, she would send word to her other sisters or siblings and say apply for a job, you know, come join me. and so within this mill community you had a number of siblings working together. it was very much a family environment. the third sister to come work for skinner was ellen littlefield. now, ellen outlasted both of her sisters
scissors. exclusive report in the new york postsaid that chief linebacker had dinner and drinkks with another woman friday night and spent the night in her apartment and then returned home and spot shot his girlfriend. this could be about domestic violence. in 2006, he punched his fist through a window because he was upset with the girl. according to the cvc shaping up to be a bad one. this strain is a great match for this year's vaccine. 120 million americans have received flu shots. give her an ambassador job. according to bloomburg news. the editor of vogue may be ambassador to france. the white house had no comment. those are the headlines. that happens all of the time. ambassadorships are favors. 92 but what is her qualification aside from being editor. >> brian: and supporter of mrs. assad. >> gretchen: if you went back in time and look at other ambassador ships >> chris: it could doesn't go to her could go to mr. blackwell. >> brian: finallyy a royall baby bump. kate middleton is meg frant. this morning a scare and why she's in the hospital. >> steve: little boys as well .
and deficit reduction for the long term. >> there's a piece in the "new york times" talking about the president's new negotiate i want aing style. it said mr. obama scattered by failed negotiations in his first term and emboldened by his re-election has shown to be a dlimp different negotiate or. the white house reminded people what the president basically campaigned on saying that everybody knew going in what they were getting re-lecting th this stifle president. does he walk with confidence of re-election under his belt and is this the way it's going to go, nor mr. nice guy approach? >> i think the president believes very strongly that we can't repeat the mistakes of the past. that going back to tax cuts for the wealthiest americans, hoping that trickles down the rest of us have failed us for well over a decade. what we need to do instead is be serious about protecting the middle class and the republicans agree with that. don't hold those tax breaks for millionaires hostage. let's reduce taxes for the middle class. that's something that we all agree on fine let's get it done. if
'm melissa lee live from the new york stock exchange. negative across the board, looks like we're going to lose about 8.5% on the dow. we're watching for headlines out of an ecd press report. our road map this morning starting with apple, cratering on its biggest decline yesterday on four years, closing just pennies off the lows of the session. the stock continues lower premarket as investors watch the death cross watch. >> a cnbc exclusive, tim geithner says over the cliff is a must. >> bank of england and ecb keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >> apple as we mentioned in the spotlight today, shares of the tech giant coming off their worst day in four years, sliding back into bear market territory. the one day loss erased nearly $35 billion in market cap. that chunk is bigger than 400 other s&p 500 companies. apple ceo tim cook talked to nbc's brian williams in our rock center exclusive. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, th
.97. down, yes, but still the highest ever price for early december. we've got new york state at the highest of the continental u.s. and missouri is the lowest. 3.01. missouri has the only major city we found with the average price of regular we called a two handle. and in the next hour, the gas buddy joins us and where you can find the cheapest gas in your area. and 10:45. new figures from the u.s. census bureau shows about 100,000 more people left california than moved in. that's a net out migration in 2011. shockingly enough, mike reagan was not one of them. he joins us now bright and early from los angeles. thank you for getting up so early in los angeles, we appreciate it, mike. now-- >> you've got it. thank you very much. stuart: i thought i'd get you out, sorry about that. why are all of these people leaving? conventional wisdom has it, it's taxes, taxes, taxes. is it something more? >> how about lack the education? the school system used to be number one is now 49th in the country and taxes another reason for it, cost of living another reason for it and no vision into the future that
about jefferson to give you two sides of him very quickly. matthew davis, an office seeker from new york goes to monticello to fit in the city even now, travels to lobby for the job, he was a burr loyalist. jefferson, not so much a loyalist as we know. i should quickly add one of these i say to my hamiltonian friends is at least my guy didn't get shot in jersey. [laughter] among the founders to have sent e-mails is alexander hamilton what thomas jefferson and one to get on the record and then move on if he's sitting there pleading his case and jefferson is looking sort of blow seng in that vaguely charming we had. he's not like fdr that you can leave. anyone that left his company thought he agreed with them. it's to get for the moment and not such a great way to get through the day as it turns out to he is my contact with davis and goes, grabs the fly it begins pulling apart. davis begins to realize that man of for quite as well as he hoped. a second story. there you have the man that can snap a fly, pulled apart and ferociously focused when he needs to be to read often making you thinki
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
pills. >> brian: headlines coming your way. former new york city mayor koch in the hospital. he is treated for a respiratory infection. second time he was hospitalized in the last three months. house votes on restoring lifetime protection for former president. they limit it to 10 years. the push because of national security concerns and former presidents taking on more active roles. gretchen? >> gretchen: thank you, brian. they were some of the most popular presidents in u.s. history and all elected to a second term. but it couldn't save them from the dreaded second term curse. it dated back to 1936 when president roosevelt won 46 out of 48 states. he used those results in an attempt to shake up the supreme court and that tarnished his reputation. fast forward to 1984. president reagan's economic recovery turned 49 of the 50 states red. the inran contraservice surface americans didn't like being kept in the dark . then the scandal impossible to forget. >> i want you to listen to me. i will say it again. i did not have sexual relations with that woman: >> gretchen: nick is a pres
house would be burn down. the tea boycott spread to other cities, down the coast to new york, philadelphia, charleston, and other ports. this was the original tea party movement. it was not patriotic. it was not pretty or glorious. the furry climaxed thursday, december 16th, 1773, just before kris christmas, and the dumping of a million dollars worth of british tea. the people who dumped them amounted to about six or seven dozen men, nobody knows exactly how many were there. it was dark. many disguised themselves as indians. ironically, the white colonist who slaughtered indians on site, disguised themselves as indians baa they regarded them as a symbol of freedom. this unleashed a social, political, and economic upheaval they would never again be able to control. the tea party provoked a reign of terror in boston and other american cities with american inflicting unimaginable bar bareties on each other. they dumped ships, boston staged a second tea party a few months after the first one. the mobs showed no dissent, burning homes of anyone they suspected of favoring british r
details on a gunman's deadly ambush in upstate new york, setting a fire and then shooting the first-responders. gregg: and talk about a holiday miracle. look at this. after a man makes it is mission to find a stranger's wedding ring lost on a snow-covered highway. how could you do that? >> i like to be able to get this back to him. and he can, return, pay it forward to someone else later in life. i love the holidays. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, evertime. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpn pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as.. -[ man ] 1... -[ woman ] 2... [ woman ] 3. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. patti ann: an investigation is now underway after a devastating plane crash in kazakhstan. the russian-built military jet went down yesterday near the border with uzbekistan, killing all 27 people on board. nighttime video f
for us in zurich. how will this pan out, carolyn? >> well, this is all based on reports in the "new york times" that came out overnight, ross. and the most interesting piece of information in that report at least i think is the fact that the fine for ubs in connection with the libor investigation could be higher than that that was given to barclays in the summer. remember, barclays paid $450 million to settle that libor probe. and at the time that was a record fine. so now the new york teams is talking about a fine that could be even higher than that. ubs in zurich told me they have no further comment beyond the fact that they have been fully cooperating with regulatory and enforcement authorities in this libor investigation. so we didn't get any confirmation from ubs whatsoever. but the "new york times" does report that u.s. officials are hoping to complete the settlement with ubs maybe mid-december, but of course there could always be delays.is scant, but ubs is probably looking at a very hefty fine and shares in zurich this morning are underperforming the broader market, flat versus t
. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks do
or pakistani sources, but it's according to john burns of the new "new york times" that places the corruption at $2 billion to $3 billion. >> so you don't approve? >> i wouldn't vote for him, no. [laughter] >> this, of course, has been the struggle and the tragedy of pakistan over a long period of time that when something like democratic elections occur, the sighfullian leaderships that take office fail the mandate that brought them there, and they often fail in space that's pinched and constrained by the military and the intelligent purposes. we were talking before we came out that the army's out putting tv ads up bragging about the performance in the flood as if it's something they -- out of the ordinary that an army would do. >> yes. >> so are we in a phase that's going to feel repetitious? lead to another military intervention? is there an alternative future in your estimation? >> well, you know, there's a nightmare merry-go-round you see in pakistani poll sick -- politics. heafter he was made president -- we don't call them elections, we call them selections. the same selections that bro
and went on to study elsewhere. she debuted at the metropolitan opera house in new york in 1995. she has performed on four continents and song with all the greats in the industry. "the new york times" said this. "she has a classic voice with a wide range. from her low voice to her top notes, she is a compelling stage actress. if anything, she underestimates her charisma." the critic noted that his favorite moment was after her arrest, sitting on a table with her hands tied behind her back, she slowly lifted her skirt above her knees with her teeth. he wrote that from that moment, she had the audience enthralled. thank you both for being here. >> i have just had knee surgery. we were at the kennedy center honors. my husband said it will be difficult to lift your skirt with your teeth. >> i want to start with a question for both of you. was there one person who was your mentor role model and inspired you to be where you are now? >> i started off in the magazine industry. i cannot say i had a mentor early on. the person who inspired me most is probably clay falker. he started "new york" mag
separatists among the federalists in new england and new york a wanted to secede from the union and let the south do whatever it wants to do. well, that would have been a de trail by the 500,000 slaves with no hope of freedom. i feel that he would calmed those extremists down but he had the ear of the moderate federalists like those on the supreme court especially john marshall who was opposing slavery and wanted to work to end slavery. monroe wanted to work to end slavery. patrick henry, who was an antifederalist republican to the left wanted to work and was working with quaker leaders to find a solution to this problem. so i think he could have united the people of goodwill to address this problem whereas that polarized the nation and was the beginning of polarization that would never end until the civil war. >> this is reversed time travel, if we could bring john quincy adams to our day, what do you think he would like and not like america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas to dictate to other societies the kind of societies they have to have. when he had the oppor
federalists in new england and new york to succeed from the union and let the south do whatever it wants to do. that would've been a betrayal. by then, 500,000 slaves with no hope of freedom. he i think would've called those extremists don't, but more important he had the year of the moderate federalists, like those on the supreme court, especially john marshall who was although a virginian, oppose slavery and wanted to work to end slavery. then i wanted to work to end slavery. patrick honey, who is an anti-federalist in our two republican to the left wanted to work and was working with quaker leaders to try to find some solution to the slavery problem. so i think with so many come he could have united the people with goodwill to address this problem, whereas jackson polarize the nation and is the beginning of polarization that would never end to the civil war. >> one more question to me and this is a reverse time travel question. if we could bring john quincy adams to our day, what do you think you would like and not like about america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas, it
mary, daughter of railroad tycoon eh harriman, who headed the eugenics record office in new york, saying quote, the pfizer team is going to be a purifying conflagration one day, unquote. his prophecy would come true only 20 years later at a cost of millions. fairly easy for governments to manipulate public health, medicines and doctors for purposes of quote family planning. this soon led into policies about colonial possessions and citizenship. peoples of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not fit the progress is a view of educated elite. and by their definitions, were close to quote life unworthy of life, unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony of this time, american movies followed a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism. god, fair play, and they avoided sensationalism, sexual situations and other taboo vices. american movies sold ame
. >> you've had a pretty -- i shouldn't say you, but there's been a rather -- "the new york times" called the new leaders of china a meritocracy of mediocrity and there's been a lot of talk and a new generation of leaders who haven't necessarily earned their stripes. i'm just wondering your answer to that. >> there is talk about the last 10 years being the last decade were nothing much happened. but you know, if you turn that around a little bit and i admit there's a lot of problems and many things were insulted that they said we can ride in the script now. but it was an amazing tenures nonetheless. but other countries had a 10% growth rate? person instabilities, but other countries manage to build more high-speed rail in the entire world? infrastructure and things like that. so it is easy to say these are linked uninteresting leaders. but when you look at the actual record, it's not that. so i think it's decidedly true the first of all it's hard to understand china in any terms, but if you can't maintain two opposite things happening at once, it's really difficult to understand what's go
on pricing. so for more we're joined by daniel i've, senior analyst at fbr capital markets from new york. good morning. strong set of numbers from oracle. what's the read through for the rest of the market? >> it's a great read-through, especially for q4. a lot of nervousness out there. they came through with strong numbers, and it bodes well for overall technology going into 2013. >> want to look at the details here. particularly the hardware versus software shift. now, oracle, of course, the software business continues to did well. hardware, they bought sun microsystems for, what, $5 billion, $5.6 billion a couple of years ago. and that division has posted a drop in revenue every quarter since. are we to believe that they'll finally show growth here come march? >> a good question. look, the software, you know, at this point, that's the meat and potatoes. a new software license up 10% organically. you looked real strong. that's the focus for investors. the hardware continues to be a work in progress. again, they're focusing on the more profitable areas. the key is they still expect that
to assist the construction of up to 120,000 new homes and delivering on flood defend schemes in more cities. on top of broadband expansion for our countryside and larger cities, we're funding broadband in 123 smaller -- 12 smaller cities, cambridge, darby, oxford, portsmouth, york, newport, aberdeen, and derry, londonderry. in addition to a third of a billion pounds announced this autumn for british science, we are today announcing 600 million pounds more for the u.k. scientific research infrastructure, and since improving our education system is the best investment in a competitive economy, i am today committing 270 million pounds to fund improvements in further education colleges and one billion pounds to expand good schools and build 100 new free schools and academies. [cheers and applause] mr. speaker, scotland, wales and northern ireland will get their share of additional capital spending put at their disposal as involved in administrations. on top of this five billion pounds of support for business, we are ready to provide guarantees for up to 40 billion pounds more. today i can annou
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